Public Health

Commentary

The Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) Program is the nation's single most important source for building and preserving safe and decent affordable rental housing. It is also a potentially powerful tool for improving the health and well-being of low-income families.

Commentary

Proposed budget cuts to the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) would likely result in a loss of federal housing assistance--and potential rent hikes--for thousands of low-income families. Our forthcoming study will test whether differences in the monetary value of housing assistance received by households translates into meaningful differences in health outcomes.

Understanding Community and Health Impacts of Complete Streets Policies

Springfield, Massachusetts is a mid-sized city with a large community of color population experiencing socioeconomic and health inequities. Historically there has been little infrastructure in Springfield to support active transportation and recreational walking and biking, so in 2015, Springfield City Council adopted a city-wide “Complete Streets” resolution.

Cross-post

Manmeet Kaur, executive director and founder of the Harlem-based community health organization City Health Works, is the inaugural recipient of the Janice Nittoli Practitioner Fellowship. Funded by the Rockefeller Foundation, the Nittoli Fellowship is awarded to innovative, entrepreneurial practitioners working in communities to address inequalities and is open to applications.

The Impact of Paid Sick Leave on Coverage Rates, other Fringe Benefits, and Health

The U.S. is one of three industrialized countries without universal access to paid sick leave. Thirty-five percent of all full-time employees lack this coverage. Among low-income and part-time employees, uninsurance rates exceed 80 percent. In addition to concerns about inequality, worker well-being, and productivity, a lack of paid sick leave also contributes to the spread of disease, when ill workers are forced to choose between their health and their job.

Best Practices for Addressing the Medical and Social Needs of “Super-Utilizer” Patients

This project investigates efforts in Michigan to address the needs of the “super-utilizer” population — individuals with serious health care and social needs who account for the majority of public health care expenditures in the United States. While there has been a growing number of interventions aimed this population, the existing evidence regarding impact is limited. The research is examining existing and potential policies that address the needs of super-utilizers while decreasing avoidable ED utilization and hospitalizations, and reducing health care costs.