Health Care Systems and Services

Commentary

Across the country, changes to Medicaid policy are underway. They hold the potential to dramatically alter the landscape of health care for millions of low-income individuals.

Seeing and Hearing: The Impacts of New York City's Universal Prekindergarten Program on the Health of Low-Income Children

Kai Hong, Kacie Dragan, and Sherry Glied from P4A's NYU Wagner Research Hub published a paper in the Journal of Health Economics exploring the health impacts of New York City’s 2014 roll-out of a Universal Pre-Kindergarten program.

Cross-post

In a recent opinion in The Milbank Quarterly, Dr. Lantz builds on insights from her P4A research portfolio to articulate concerns about the recent "medicalization" of population health within the health care system and its limits in making substantial improvements in population health.

How State Medicaid Policy Influences Billing for "Free Care" in Public Schools

In 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new guidance to allow providers in educational settings to seek Medicaid reimbursement for free preventive services covered by the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) benefit provided to Medicaid-enrolled children. However, following CMS’ announcement, states retained policies restricting reimbursement for these services.

Expanding Upstream Interventions with Federal Matching Funds and Social-Impact Investments

Steven H. Goldberg, Paula M. Lantz, and Samantha Iovan from the University of Michigan P4A Research Hub examine the use of federal Medicaid dollars as a payout source for non-medical services aimed at addressing social determinants of health under the 2016 Medicaid Managed Care Final Rule.

How will Work Requirements in Medicaid Affect Low-Income Families?

While multiple studies show a positive association between employment status and improved physical and mental health, it is unclear whether this relationship is causal. Building on work in Kentucky, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas, the research team will analyze the effects of Medicaid work requirements on coverage rates, access to care, and employment among low-income adults.

Cross-post

Peter Jacobson of the University of Michigan research hub writes on Harvard Law's Bill of Health blog that while legal mandates are not necessary to carrying out HiAP (Health in All Policies) initiatives, political support for them is.