Jamie F. Chriqui

Professor of Health Policy and Administration
Organization
University of Illinois at Chicago

Jamie F. Chriqui, PhD, MHS is professor of health policy and administration in the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and co-director of the Health Policy Center at the Institute for Health Research and Policy at UIC. Dr. Chriqui’s research focuses on studying public health policies adopted at the federal, state and local levels nationwide on communities, school, and individual-level outcomes, with a particular emphasis on obesity, nutrition, and physical activity-related issues. Her recent and current research includes conducting the largest, ongoing nationwide evaluation of the congressionally-mandated wellness policies and their alignment with new federal regulations and impact on school practices; studying the impact of school food policies at the state and district levels on school practices and student consumption; examining the implementation of complete streets policies; and studying the relationship between new urbanist and pedestrian-oriented zoning on adult leisure time and travel-related activity. She also specializes in policy surveillance and policy measurement for use in large scale evaluation studies. She has been a member of two recent Institute of Medicine Committees; is a current member of the Community Preventive Services Task Force; and several other federal, foundation, non-profit and academic boards, advisory committees, and expert panels.

Read Dr. Chriqui’s bio at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Projects

Due to budget shortfalls, many states and school districts are implementing pay-to-play policies that allow collection of fees for participation in extracurricular activities such as school sports. The number of school districts with these policies has grown over the last decade, with some states reporting a two-fold increase. Although the extent of these policies and the amount of the fees for participation vary greatly, it seems likely that the overall effects of pay-to-pay policies may disproportionally affect low-income students.

In April 2016, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued updated standards governing the meal pattern requirements for the Child and Adult Care Food Programs (CACFP), effective October 1, 2017. The updated standards will require participating providers to serve more whole grains, a greater variety of fruits and vegetables, and reduce the amount of solid fats and added sugars (SOFAS) in meals.

Evidence

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Rebecca M. Schermbeck, Julien Leider, and Jamie F. Chriqui release the first-ever report on whether CACFP-participating early childhood centers are limiting sugary cereals for children aged 2-5 years. Nearly one-third of these centers failed to meet the sugar-in-cereal requirement.

Using a nationwide sample of early childcare centers, Jamie Chriqui, Julien Leider, and Rebecca M. Schermbeck assess centers’ awareness of and reported readiness for implementing updated standards from the Child and Adult Care Food Program.

Jamie Chriqui, Rebecca M. Schermbeck, and Julien Leider assess menu development, meal/snack preparation, provider meal preparation-related training, and food purchasing at early childcare centers.