Funded Projects

The Policies for Action program (P4A) funds research identifying policies, laws, and other regulatory tools in the public and private sectors that can support RWJF’s mission to build a Culture of Health.

Research is conducted at institutions across the United States. The projects by our Research Hubs and other grantees investigate policies and laws that are traditionally and directly correlated with health outcomes, but also nontraditional areas of focus that influence population health, well-being and equity — including policies and regulations from areas such as education, economics, transportation, justice, and housing.

Funded Projects

Show me projects related to...

In April 2016, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued updated standards governing the meal pattern requirements for the Child and Adult Care Food Programs (CACFP), effective October 1, 2017. The updated standards will require participating providers to serve more whole grains, a greater variety of fruits and vegetables, and reduce the amount of solid fats and added sugars (SOFAS) in meals.

Principal Investigator: Jamie F. Chriqui - University of Illinois at Chicago
Law stands as a significant influence on health equity, and an essential means of advancing a Culture of Health characterized by an equitable distribution of well-being. This project combines applied research and translation activities to answer a series of questions designed to improve our understanding and implementation of law and policy to address health inequity through housing
Principal Investigator: Scott Burris - Temple University Center for Public Health Law Research
“Pay for Success” is a public/private partnership approach to financing proven prevention interventions that help the public sector save money or achieve greater value for an investment. This project will explore the potential for and best practices by which Pay for Success initiatives (also known as social impact bonds) can address the social determinants of health and reduce public expenditures on health/social services.
Principal Investigator: Paula Lantz - Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

Surprisingly little is known about how housing policy and neighborhood features impact health. This project will identify evidence-based housing policies to improve health, and develop a measure to understand the real-time impact of housing policy on health outcomes.

Principal Investigator: Sherry Glied - NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

Federal housing assistance benefits 11 million people through three main programs: public housing, project-based Section 8 housing, and housing choice vouchers. Researchers use multiple datasets to examine the effects of federal housing assistance programs on food security, health-promoting behaviors, and health outcomes.

Principal Investigator: Lisa Dubay - Urban Institute
The “Health in All Policies” (HiAP) strategy works to integrate health and equity considerations into the design and evaluation of policies and services. This project involves a data-driven investigation of local/state HiAP activities. The researchers will design and implement a national HiAP surveillance system and conduct a multiple-site case study of 10 HiAP efforts at different stages.
Principal Investigator: Paula Lantz - Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

While transportation planning has not traditionally been linked to health, it affects health in various ways. This project will analyze policies around transportation-associated access to health care, develop a transportation-related project to reduce injuries and mortality, assess the affects that access to cycling has on health, and develop measures of transportation-sensitive health conditions.

Principal Investigator: Sherry Glied - NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service
This series of case studies identifies and describes several emerging and promising interventions that sit at the intersection of housing and health across the country. Interventions reflect a variety of approaches and models from a diversity of communities and will span both the public and private sectors.
Principal Investigator: Lisa Dubay - Urban Institute
This project investigates efforts in Michigan to address the needs of the “super-utilizer” population — individuals with serious health care and social needs who account for the majority of public health care expenditures in the United States. While there has been a growing number of interventions aimed this population, the existing evidence regarding impact is limited. The research is examining existing and potential policies that address the needs of super-utilizers while decreasing avoidable ED utilization and hospitalizations, and reducing health care costs.
Principal Investigator: Paula Lantz - Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan
This study examines whether a community intervention monitoring glucose and providing diabetes appropriate food can improve health and reduce health care utilization. It builds on Feeding America’s Intervention Trial for Health-Diabetes Mellitus (FAITH-DM) study with a new follow-up round of data collection and new data analyses.
Principal Investigator: Lisa Dubay - Urban Institute