Evidence

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What kind of cost savings could be achieved if a "Pay for Success" (PFS) financing model were applied to a home-based, multi-component asthma intervention among low-income children on Medicaid in Detroit? The University of Michigan Research Hub team found that the economics of a PFS intervention are most viable if it targets children who have already experienced an expensive episode of asthma-related care.

The University of Michigan Research Hub conducted 65 semi-structured interviews with state and local officials in five states where "Health in All Policies" initiatives were underway, with a goal of examining whether and how policymakers and advocates use the framework to elevate health equity as a policy concern across sectors and jurisdictions.

Sandy Ahn and Sabrina Corlette from the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University released a paper analyzing the findings from a 50-state review of policies that lower consumers’ cost-sharing for expensive prescription drugs. The research was supplemented by in-depth interviews with officials and stakeholders in four states with such policies.

Elaine Waxman and Corianne Scally of the Urban Institute Research Hub have released a new study examining emerging interventions that integrate housing and health services for low-income people, focusing on interventions where health care organizations have taken a significant leadership role.

ABC/CARE was a comprehensive, birth through age five early childhood development program that included early health, nutrition, parental education and early childhood education. Complementing their recent cost-benefit analysis of the ABC/CARE program, Dr. James Heckman and his team look at the differences in outcomes based on gender in their paper, Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program.